Octopus is a very popular appetizer  in Greece.  It reminds me of relaxing moments near the beach in the summer time enjoying magic moments with friends and relatives.  To be specific cooked octopus reminds me of a summer in Monemvasia.

Monemvasia is a village located in Laconia, Greece in the Peloponnese.  It has an amazing ancient city inside a real castle, if you haven’t visited this part of Greece it is a must visit location.  Anyway, during the summer my cousins from New York visit Greece for their vacation.  There was this one summer that we went to Monemvasia to a small tavern and ordered octopus and cold beer.  We had the best time laughing having fun while enjoying the Mediterranean sea with a view of the ancient city inside the castle.

Octopus is a tricky to prepare, if you don’t cook it well it will be chewy and tough much like hard chewing gum.  The way we cook it is easy and you will succeed every time you cook it guaranteed, tender and full of flavor!

The octopus we buy is whole and cleaned without  its ink etc.  Depending where  you get your octopus you might have to remove the beak (which is located directly under the head and in the middle of the legs).  For the head you could just chop it off if you don’t want to clean it out.  Be careful though because the ink can get very messy.

What you will need

  • Octopus about 1 kg (2.2 pounds)
  • Olive oil
  • Vinegar
  • Oregano
  • Salt
  • Pepper

Instructions

  1. Weigh your octopus and wrap in aluminum foil.  This is the secret to tender easy octopus, make sure you use plenty of foil to prevent the moisture from escaping but don’t wrap it too tightly.Weigh your octopus and wrap in aluminum foil.  This is the secret to tender easy octopus, make sure you use plenty of foil to prevent the moisture from escaping but don’t wrap it too tightly.
  2. Place your foil wrapped octopus in a pan to prevent any accidental juice from dripping in your oven; less clean up time.
  3. Bake in preheated oven for one hour.  As a rule you bake the octopus according to its weight.  For example one hour per kilo (one hour per 2.2 pounds) of octopus etc.  Please resist the temptation of opening the foil to see if the octopus in cooked. Trust me, if you follow the one hour per kg (2.2 pounds) rule it will come out perfect.
  4. Let the octopus cool (be very careful not to burn yourself when opening the foil as the steam is VERY hot) then cut it in bite size pieces and season with vinegar, olive oil, salt and pepper to your liking.